Key west golf club to recharge my batteries after a great season!  #reesjones first design.

Key west golf club to recharge my batteries after a great season! #reesjones first design.

Titleist rep talks aboutProV1

A reduction in dimples decreases drag. End result, crazy long drives. Pro V1 is the highest spinning ball on the PGA tour. After test driving both offering, the front range golfer agrees. Want to hit longer drives? Pick up a dozen!

Titleist

Next up on the Front Range- My conversation with Colorado’s Titleist rep. Don’t miss it!

Breath Johnny… Breath

If you haven’t seen this golf fix with miller… It’s amazing. Johnny spills a book into your ears without pausing to take a breath. Take notes people.

Forgot all about Kevin Na.

Breath Johnny… Breath

If you haven’t seen this golf fix with miller… It’s amazing. Johnny spills a book into your ears without pausing to take a breath. Take notes people.

Forgot all about Kevin Na.

The Golf Fix with Kevin Na, Johnny Miller

Michael Breed interviews at bay hill. It’s nice to Johnny Miller with a club in his hand. He just said Tiger is now working on a “Johnny Miller” move! Brazen Miller…love it or hate it. I love it…

Extend your hand, lengthen your clubs

Part of proper club fitting is to make sure your clubs are proper length.  If they are too short, you’ll most likely hit the ball thin and/or on the toe.  Bad posture is also a result of a poorly fit golf club.  With ordinary tools and a little know-how, you can lengthen your clubs.

Tools needed

  1. Pipe cutter (used to cut electrical conduit-$15 at your local hardware store)
  2. Two Part Epoxy
  3. Coarse Sandpaper
  4. Utility Knife
  5. Vise
  6. Hammer
  7. Old Rag to wipe up Epoxy

In this example, I’m extending steel shafted clubs.  Follow similar steps for graphite shafted clubs.  You can substitute a pipe cutter for a hack saw and make sure your utility knife has a hooked blade.

Steps Involved

  1. Cut extension in half using pipe cutter 
  2. Roughen up tip of extension with coarse sandpaper
  3. Remove old grip and tape from golf club
  4. Mix epoxy and spread on tip of extension with a golf tee
  5. Twist extension into butt end of the club-allow time to cure
  6. Crimp shaft and extension by hitting shaft against metal block to make an indention to prevent movement if epoxy bond breaks.
  7. Cut extension to desire size (1/2” in my example)
  8. Use deburr tool to clean up the sharp edges

Now your ready to re-grip your newly lengthened club!

Next time on the the Front Range…..

I will be relaying a discussion with Colorado’s Titleist Rep regarding all of the new gear for 2011! 

Bounce around the room

Titleist VokeyEveryone knows of the success Bob Vokey has achieved while making wedges under the Titleist flag.  For the most part, all wedges follow the Cleveland 588 mold.  They typically have heavy swing weights (D4+) and a traditional shape. 

Currently, I’m in the market for three.  I’m replacing my Cleveland CG14 (52,56,& 60 degree) wedges with the same lofted Vokey C-C oil can variety.  There is a lot of talk regarding bounce.  The reason wedges need bounce is to prevent the leading edge from digging into the ground or sand and to “bounce” through the turf.  Less bounce is more conducive to playing tight lies while more bounce would benefit in the sand.  It is my strategic plan to diversify my attack clubs with a low bounce 56.08, middle bounce 52.08, and high bounce 60.10. With a fresh set of grooves, a new set with multiple options is sure to boost your confidence inside the scoring zone!

Things to keep in mind while wedge shoppingGolf Shop

  • Anything but Chrome- this isn’t Sturgis…  Chrome is much harder of a finish then oil can, black pearl, satin, RTG, etc.  Soft=more feel & non-chrome isn’t as reflective on those bright Tuesday mornings you call in sick!
  • Static Weight vs. Swing Weight-  You want your wedges to be heavier or at least feel heavy (swing weight).  Digging into some cabbage with your graphite shafted/cavity back SW that matches your set only makes the inside of your bag look good.  A little metal behind the ball helps with touch.  Think BLADES.
  • Manufacturer- for the most part, all companies are producing similar designed wedges.  How can you tell them apart?  Hold the club in your hand and waggle.  You’ll know what feels good instantly.  Your looking for comfort both visually and physically.  Think of a carpenter and his hammer.  
  • Shaft material and flex- although graphite shafts due increase the swing weight (feel of the head), they reduce the static weight (total weight) which as previously mentioned may reduce “solid” feel.  Wedges come standard with a wedge shaft.  Basically a stiff shafted club.  The main reason behind this is due to the length and loft of the club.  Flex is not as important since the lofted club does not have issues getting airborne.  
  • Bounce- see above.  Then ask your local PGA professional.  Based on your home course or state, more or less bounce may be desired.  Think about the fluffy white sands of Florida bunkers and the coarse gravel seen at some munies.  Your Pro will know!
  • Don’t be afraid to spend a little- chances are your going to keep these wedges as long as your last pair!

As April approaches, now is a good time to start upgrading your equipment.  Till next time, putt for dough people…

Welcome

Thanks for you interests in Front Range golf! In the next couple weeks we’ll cover topics ranging from area courses to golf club optimization. We look forward to the upcoming season and sharing our knowledge with all of you!